Browsing articles in "news"
Apr
17
2014

Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) released

The Ubuntu team is very pleased to announce our fifth long-term support
release, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS for Desktop, Server, Cloud, and Core, as well
as Ubuntu 14.04 for Phone and Tablet products.

Codenamed “Trusty Tahr”, 14.04 LTS continues Ubuntu’s proud tradition
of integrating the latest and greatest open source technologies into a
high-quality, easy-to-use Linux distribution.  The team has been hard at
work through this cycle, introducing new features and fixing bugs.

Ubuntu 14.04 LTS is the first long-term support release with support
for the new “arm64″ architecture for 64-bit ARM systems, as well as the
“ppc64el” architecture for little-endian 64-bit POWER systems.  This
release also includes several subtle but welcome improvements to Unity,
AppArmor, and a host of other great software.

Ubuntu Server 14.04 LTS includes the Icehouse release of OpenStack,
alongside deployment and management tools that save devops teams time
when deploying distributed applications – whether on private clouds,
public clouds, x86 or ARM servers, or on developer laptops.  Several key
server technologies, from MAAS to Ceph, have been updated to new upstream
versions with a variety of new features.

The newest Kubuntu, Edubuntu, Xubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu GNOME, Ubuntu
Kylin, and Ubuntu Studio are also being released today.  More details
can be found for these at their individual release notes:

   https://wiki.ubuntu.com/TrustyTahr/ReleaseNotes#Official_flavours

Maintenance updates will be provided for 5 years for Ubuntu Desktop,
Ubuntu Server, Ubuntu Cloud, Ubuntu Core, Ubuntu Kylin, Edubuntu, and
Kubuntu.  All the remaining flavours will be supported for 3 years.

To get Ubuntu 14.04 LTS

In order to download Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, visit:

   http://www.ubuntu.com/download

Users of Ubuntu 12.10 and 13.10 will be offered an automatic upgrade to
14.04 LTS via Update Manager shortly. Users of 12.04 LTS will be
offered the automatic upgrade when 14.04.1 LTS is released, which is
scheduled for July 24th. For further information about upgrading, see:

   http://www.ubuntu.com/download/desktop/upgrade

As always, upgrades to the latest version of Ubuntu are entirely free
of charge.

We recommend that all users read the release notes, which document
caveats, workarounds for known issues, as well as more in-depth notes
on the release itself. They are available at:

   http://wiki.ubuntu.com/TrustyTahr/ReleaseNotes

Find out what’s new in this release with a graphical overview:

   http://www.ubuntu.com/desktop
   http://www.ubuntu.com/desktop/features

Apr
14
2014

Linux KVM Virtualization comes to IBM Power servers soon

Since 2007, when the Linux 2.6.20 kernel was released, Linux has had its own built-in hypervisor: Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM). What was nice about that was that it made virtualization easy if you were running virtual machines (VM) on Intel or AMD processors with virtualization extensions Intel TV or AMD-V, respectively. What wasn’t so nice was that those were the only chips you could run KVM on. Almost a year ago, IBM promised that they would port KVM to its high-end Power architecture. Now, Big Blue is ready to deliver on its promise.

In a blog posting, Jim Wasko, Director of IBM’s Linux Technology Center, said “that a Power Systems version of KVM, PowerKVM, will be available on IBM’s next generation Power Systems servers tuned for Linux before the end of the quarter.”

Source:

http://www.zdnet.com/linux-kvm-virtualization-comes-to-ibm-power-servers-soon-7000028353/

Apr
14
2014

The Imaging Source announces Linux support for its cameras

The Imaging Source has announced the immediate availability of open source Linux support for all of its cameras.
Released under the Apache License 2.0, the source code is available as an open source project and allows the integration of all cameras with GigE, USB, and FireWire interfaces into popular distributions, including Debian, Ubuntu, CentOS, and Red Hat.
“We have seen customer demand for Linux support continually grow in the past few years,” said Rolf Bollhorst, CEO and founder of The Imaging Source. “In the meantime, we work with Linux every day. Therefore, it makes sense for us to offer comprehensive Open Source software at GitHub.com to integrate our cameras into popular distributions. We look forward to the feedback from our customers.”

Source:

http://www.vision-systems.com/articles/2014/04/the-imaging-sources-announces-linux-supports-for-its-cameras.html

Apr
14
2014

Cool and flexible: The Linux alternative

Have you ever wondered what happened to Linux? Linux is the free software created through the open source development process that many technology enthusiasts had predicted would revolutionise the world of computing.

It may not be widely known, but Linux did revolutionise computing. If you own an Android phone or a Kindle e-reader, you are a Linux user. Linux is at the core of those popular devices and is found in a variety of other places, from the world’s most powerful supercomputers down to the tiny Raspberry Pi device that is a favourite among electronics hobbyists.

But Linux has had less success in personal computers. Fewer than 2 percent of desktop or laptop computers run it, according to a survey by Net Applications. That could be because for the bulk of Windows and Mac users, switching entirely to Linux probably does not make sense. But exploring Linux could still be worth the time for those looking for a proven, low-cost alternative to the two mainstream operating systems.
Source:

http://www.deccanherald.com/content/398909/cool-flexible-linux-alternative.html

Apr
14
2014

Python 2.7 To Be Maintained Until 2020

Python 2.7 will have extended support until 2020 and there won’t be any version 2.8, Guido van Rossum explained at the PyCon 2014. Guido van Rossum presented his update of the 0373 PEP (Python Enhancement Proposal).
The PEP 0373 regulates the roadmap for Python 2.7. This version receives support until 2020 according to van Rossum. This prolonged support should help companies and institutions that have not changed to Python 3 yet. At the same time van Rossum made ​​it clear that there would be no version 2.8 of Python, so that version 2.7 is the last in the line 2.

Source:

http://www.linux-magazin.de/content/view/full/86680?utm_source=LMO&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=LMO-Newsletter

Apr
14
2014

Desperately Seeking Linux Programmers

Few people know just how pervasive Linux has become, and that is causing a big problem for companies that increasingly rely on it. “There is a shortage of software developers in the U.S. The employment rate for these jobs is down to 2.3 percent in the last quarter. The opportunity for jobs is now there for people who come in to get this training,” said Vice President Shravan Goli.
Help Wanted: computer programmers needed to code and maintain Linux systems.
The Linux operating system and Linux servers are so widely used today that not enough Linux-trained coders and system techs exist. Software developers and enterprise IT departments have jobs but no takers.
To fill this shortage, the Linux Foundation has partnered with edX to offer a free online course to help computer engineers learn Linux.

Source:

http://www.linuxinsider.com/story/Desperately-Seeking-Linux-Programmers-80290.html

Apr
14
2014

“Open Network Linux” could boost viability of vendor-neutral switches

The Facebook-led Open Compute Project has spent the past year building an “open” switch that can boot nearly any type of networking software, giving customers more alternatives to proprietary switch vendors such as Cisco.
Intel, Broadcom, Mellanox and Cumulus Networks jumped on board last November, contributing specifications and software that will bring the project closer to a finished design. They weren’t alone, though: Software-defined networking vendor Big Switch Networks, in January, donated what it calls Open Network Linux (ONL) to the project.
Source:

http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2014/04/open-network-linux-could-boost-viability-of-bare-metal-switches/

Apr
14
2014

Wasteland 2 Linux release confirmed

For all you Wasteland fans out there, Wasteland 2 is finally getting a Linux release, thanks to the engine it is being developed on, getting native Linux support. Wasteland 2 is an RPG being developed by inXile Entertainment and developer Brian Fargo.
For the uninitiated, the original game came out way back in 1988. The game’s premise is that of humans fighting for survival in a post-apocalyptic America. Sounds similar to something? If your answer is Fallout, then you’d be absolutely correct. Wasteland was the precursor to the Fallout series, created by the same developers. The original Wasteland game was published by Electronic Arts. Despite doing really well, the publisher didn’t go for a sequel even with the developers pushing for one. The developers didn’t stop and instead made another game with the same premise, Fallout. The game was a critical hit and ended up spawning multiple sequels. Now in the age of crowd funding, with the variable of publisher dependence out of the equation, inXile Entertainment is finally getting back to its roots and developing a sequel to the game that started it all.

Source:

http://www.muktware.com/2014/04/wasteland-2-linux-release-confirmed/25398

Apr
14
2014

CAELinux Is the Ideal Distro for Designing Scientists

The primary reason for adopting CAELinux is the specialized scientific and engineering computing tasks of its users. This distro comes packed with Linux versions of leading multiplatform programs that are workhorse tools. Specialized software includes dozens of titles for printing, graphical display, engineering and electronics. Even the caliber of office and computing accessories is impressive.
CAELinux is a perfect example of the power of open source to tailor the Linux operating system to users’ specialized needs.

Source:

http://www.linuxinsider.com/story/CAELinux-Is-the-Ideal-Distro-for-Designing-Scientists-80277.html

Apr
14
2014

SUSE simplifies mainframe Linux installation

SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for System z is optimized for the IBM System z architecture and is the No. 1 Linux installed on those mainframes. Even with little or no Linux or z/VM experience, customers can install SUSE Linux Enterprise Server Starter System for System z and take advantage of the combined solution’s benefits of consolidating servers and virtualizing Linux, UNIX and Windows workloads.
“Installing Linux on a mainframe is different from installing Linux on an x86 server,” said Meike Chabowski, Product Marketing Manager for enterprise Linux servers at SUSE. “The Starter System for System z makes installation quicker and easier, and customers can get a headstart on their mainframe Linux proof-of-concepts with existing IT skills.”

Source:

http://www.ciol.com/ciol/news/212805/suse-simplifies-mainframe-linux-installation

Pages:«12345

Read Full Circle at:


You can also read Full Circle online at: http://issuu.com/fullcirclemagazine


You can also read Full Circle online via Google Play/Books

Go on Flattr us

All donations go to buying you folks some awesome competition prizes.

Subscribe

You can subscribe to get an email update every time a new issue of the magazine comes out.

Name:

E-mail:


About

Full Circle is a free, independent, monthly magazine dedicated to the Ubuntu family of Linux operating systems. Each month, it contains helpful how-to articles and reader submitted stories.

Full Circle also features a companion podcast, the Full Circle Podcast, which covers the magazine along with other news of interest.